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Politics 101: How Not To Campaign In A Military Camp

February 27, 2010

Malacanang’s slip is showing.

Deputy presidential spokesperson Charito Planas:

Let’s leave it to the commander of the camp, where it (for alleged illegal campaigning of  Nacionalista Party (NP) standard-bearer Manuel Villar for his detained senatorial candidate, Marine Col. Ariel Querubin, in Camp Aguinaldo) took place.

Querubin is facing court martial for mutiny and other similar charges for his role in the alleged attempt to overthrow the Arroyo administration in February 2006.

Military spokesman Lt. Col. Romeo Brawner:

Our officers at ISAFP tried to prevent [the unity walk] because it could have constituted something more than just the permission that was given to them. What happened was they [Villar’s group] had their pictures taken and the ISAFP [personnel] could not prevent the media from taking pictures, AFP chief of staff Gen. Victor Ibrado has warned Villar not to repeat such an incident.

Predictably, Villar asserts:

Wala naman akong nakikitang ibang tao dun, puro sundalo lang. “Kung kami ay mangangampanya dun na kami sa maraming tao (I didn’t see any other people there. There were just soldiers. If ever we planned to campaign, we should have held it at a crowded place).

That’s it?

Whatever happened to the supposedly sacre rule of insulating the military from partisan politics?

Would Malacañang display this attitude if former President Estrada or say Senator Noynoy Aquino visited Camp Aguinaldo?

What if its avowed candidate, former Sefense chief Gibo Teodoro copied the Villar stunt?

The proof of the pudding is in the eating, so the axiom goes.

To many observers his episode affirms who the real bet of Malacañang is.

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